Posts Tagged ‘government reform’

Gov’t Waste Exposed in West Tennessee

Action News 5 in Memphis analyzes Beacon’s 2014 Pork Report, and gets the reaction of local officials who were caught abusing taxpayer money. One official even admitted to failing to follow the law:

Haywood County taxpayers forked out $41,000 for a new fingerprint machine, another $39,000 for two used patrol cars, and nearly $40,000 for new tires for school buses at Haywood County Schools. None of those items went through the proper bidding requirements.

“We try to comply with the law, but there are occasions that we don’t,” Haywood County Mayor Franklin Smith said. “We didn’t fulfill the requirement, as far as advertising fingerprint machines or the vehicles, but we didn’t solicit bids locally.”

When asked if that was against the law, Smith said, “Well it’s a violation, yeah, and I get written up for it.”

Watch the entire story here.

 

October 8th, 2014 | Commentary

Vote Yes on 2 is best path for judicial selection

In a joint Tennessean op-ed, former Gov. Phil Bredesen and Sen. Fred Thompson promote the launch of the “Yes on 2″ campaign, which is supported by Beacon.

Amendment #2 also has the support of such top organizations as the Tennessee Chamber of Commerce & Industry, Tennessee Business Roundtable, Tennessee Bar Association, Tennessee Farm Bureau Federation, Beacon Center of Tennessee and many others that have already endorsed or are actively supporting it.

You can read the whole article here.

April 29th, 2014 | Recent News

Obama’s central planners promise $18 million to TN to end homelessness

Tennessee Watchdog recently wrote an article about the recent $18 million promised to Tennessee from the Federal Government to help end homelessness.  The article cited the Beacon Center’s objection to this plan.

Mark Cunningham, spokesman for the Nashville-based Beacon Center of Tennessee told Tennessee Watchdog that solving homelessness isn’t as simple as the government indicates.

“Good intentions aside, history shows that simply increasing funding to provide for the homeless does not equate to diminishing or eliminating the homeless populations in our nation’s most poverty-ridden communities,” Cunningham said.

Cunningham cited New York City as an example.

“The city is able to provide shelter and sustenance for over 85 percent of the homeless population. Yet these individuals remain sheltered and dependent upon these handouts, which places an unsustainable burden upon the government to continuously increase funding as more citizens seek these services and fewer transition off the federal tab.”

Cunningham suggested private means, such as a charity, as an alternative to reducing homelessness.

Read the entire article here.

April 28th, 2014 | Recent News